The GFRC Open Set Registry Community Project

$20 Double Eagle, Liberty Head Type 1

Following the discovery of large deposits of gold in California in 1849 the United States Mint decided to issue a $20 denominated gold coin for the first time. This Double Eagle (2 times the value of the $10 Eagle) was first struck in 1849 as a proof coin in Philadelphia. This unique coin is currently in the Smithsonian Institute museum. Beginning in 1850 Double Eagles were minted in Philadelphia and in New Orleans and In 1854 minting of Double Eagles began in San Francisco. Collecting a complete set of Type 1 coins is possible but both challenging due to availability as well as financially. Collecting Double Eagles from the Civil War period set is a popular variation for Double Eagle collectors. In 1866 the Type one Design came to an end with the design change adding "IN GOD WE TRUST" to the reverse of the coin. Only 120,00 Type 1 coins were minted in San Francisco before switching to the type 2 design.



Click Collection Name to view its composition. The Blank Collection is an empty version.

Collection Rating Complete Weighted Grade caccoin.com Last Updated
The Blank Collection
Collection Rating Complete Weighted Grade caccoin.com Last Updated
The Blank Collection

Rating: The weighted average of all coin grades (i.e. aggregated sum of each coin grade + CAC premium multiplied by its rarity factor divided by the sum of all rarity factors). Missing coins are included and assigned a grade of 0. This metric is the basis for order rank.

Complete: The number of coin entries divided by the total number of coins in the Set.

Weighted Grade: The weighted average of all coin grades (see calculation above), but excluding any missing coins.

%: The ratio of coins certified by CAC (either green or gold sticker). Calculated as the number of CAC coins divided by the total number of entered coins.

Rarity Factor: The rarity assessment for each date/variety uses the Sheldon scale of R1 through R8 with a R1 weight being the most common while an R8 weight being the most difficult to locate. Rarity estimates are by Osprey.